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Ask me anything   22, black, Master's Student, Scientist, and Hardcore Nerd. (She/her/hers)

branwyn-says:

phemiec:

Sometimes when I’m sad, I think about this video and then my whole life is instantly better.

oh my god

(via fashiondisastercecil)

— 3 days ago with 3191 notes
#oh my god  #clementine-season 

surrogatelark:

today i was driving home from work with my windows down and i was waiting at a red light, and a bee came zooming in my passenger side window and flew into my forehead, then bounced against my steering wheel/windshield, and bumbled right out the driver’s side window. definitely crapped my pants a lil.

I would have freaked. A bee flew into the house and I screamed so loud Mike thought an animal had attacked me.

— 3 days ago with 7 notes
#surrogatelark 

fashiondisastercecil:

he actually knows a fuckton about trees it’s just thE PRINCIPLE OF THE THIGN

— 4 days ago with 404 notes

lovelyandbrown:

bootyscientist:

nice boobs and nice ass isn’t a requirement from my girl. like i ain’t gon turn down a shawty wit a perfect personality and a beautiful face cause she don’t got no body. body is icing on the cake but pound cake ain’t got no icing and i fuck wit that heavy. 

Slay

(via wombman)

— 6 days ago with 24523 notes
#food 

-teesa-:

3.6.14

Aasif Mandvi interviews Fox Business commentator, Todd Wilemon.

(via anmiath)

— 6 days ago with 177919 notes

giandujakiss:

onelostsoulswiminginafishbowl:

sparky-sparkerson:

cptfantasy:

Housecat meets bobcat

“why are you trapped in there, tiny orange bobcat”

omg the kitty knocking on the window

ive seen this a few times and it’s just the most adorable thing in the universe so i must reblog in case anyone has missed it

(via cupcakepotterkid)

— 1 week ago with 231977 notes
Teaching Consent to Small Children →

afrafemme:

A friend and I were out with our kids when another family’s two-year-old came up. She began hugging my friend’s 18-month-old, following her around and smiling at her. My friend’s little girl looked like she wasn’t so sure she liked this, and at that moment the other little girl’s mom came up and got down on her little girl’s level to talk to her.

“Honey, can you listen to me for a moment? I’m glad you’ve found a new friend, but you need to make sure to look at her face to see if she likes it when you hug her. And if she doesn’t like it, you need to give her space. Okay?”

Two years old, and already her mother was teaching her about consent.

My daughter Sally likes to color on herself with markers. I tell her it’s her body, so it’s her choice. Sometimes she writes her name, sometimes she draws flowers or patterns. The other day I heard her talking to her brother, a marker in her hand.

“Bobby, do you mind if I color on your leg?”

Bobby smiled and moved himself closer to his sister. She began drawing a pattern on his leg with a marker while he watched, fascinated. Later, she began coloring on the sole of his foot. After each stoke, he pulled his foot back, laughing. I looked over to see what was causing the commotion, and Sally turned to me.

“He doesn’t mind if I do this,” she explained, “he is only moving his foot because it tickles. He thinks its funny.” And she was right. Already Bobby had extended his foot to her again, smiling as he did so.

What I find really fascinating about these two anecdotes is that they both deal with the consent of children not yet old enough to communicate verbally. In both stories, the older child must read the consent of the younger child through nonverbal cues. And even then, consent is not this ambiguous thing that is difficult to understand.

Teaching consent is ongoing, but it starts when children are very young. It involves both teaching children to pay attention to and respect others’ consent (or lack thereof) and teaching children that they should expect their own bodies and their own space to be respected—even by their parents and other relatives.

And if children of two or four can be expected to read the nonverbal cues and expressions of children not yet old enough to talk in order to assess whether there is consent, what excuse do full grown adults have?

— 1 week ago with 22548 notes
For those going on internet blind dates (or just traveling somewhere alone)

slackmcnasty:

earthwindandherpes:

Kitestring is a simple webapp that checks up on you and sends a text message to your emergency contacts if you don’t respond by a designated time.

Enter your ETA and Kitestring will send you a text message to reply to. You can extend your check in time via SMS or check in early. If you don’t respond to Kitestring’s text message, your emergency contact(s) will get your customizable alert message. [x]

Important

(via lookatmenoire)

— 1 week ago with 52056 notes

lana-grant-may:

carry-on-my-wayward-nun:

p1ants:

i think freckles, stretch marks, tattoos, bruises, birthmarks and scars are probably the coolest thing, you started with almost a blank canvas and look at u now, all this evidence that you’ve lived and the sun has shone on you and you’ve grown and maybe tripped up a few times and liked an image so much u made it a permanent part of u, beautiful.

That’s one of the most uplifting things I’ve read

This needs to get passed around more

(Source: paintgod, via deviantlydark)

— 2 weeks ago with 825107 notes

themarchrabbit:

Seriously, it kills me when I see people hold scientists up as pinnacles of logic and reason.

Because one time the professor I was interning for got punched in the face by another professor, because mine got the funding, and told the other professor his theory was stupid.

This same professor told me to throw rocks to scare the “stupid fucking crabs” into moving so we could count them properly.

SCIENCE

This is my entire life.

(Source: ruingaraf, via surrogatelark)

— 2 weeks ago with 41409 notes